Thursday, 14 April 2011

Talking of Mad Old Women...

I have just bought this candlestick which has been in the family of Barbara Cartland for over 300 years - sorry about the photo, but I haven't yet picked it up, so this is a photo of the seller's photo, taken by me off the screen of my computor.

"Who is/was Barbara Cartland?" I hear you mad old women ask. Well you ought to know her, because she was the quintessential mad old woman's mad old woman, and - just like all you other mad old women out there in blogging world, she was obsessed with the colour pink.

It's a little 'taper-stick' actually - used for sealing the wax on love-letters, just like the ones created in all the ripping novels of Barbara Cartland - yes, she was a writer, but unlike many of you mad old women out there, she was a commercially successful one (God knows why or how).

Now tell me that antique candlesticks have no relevance or interest in your bloggy lives!

11 comments:

  1. Candlesticks do not, but I actually read some Barbara Cartland in my teens and then was excited to learn she was somehow related to Diana Spencer. Now, what was it she wrote...... hmmmmmm. Can't remember, but I do remember exactly how she looked in the photo for her jacket cover. Now, where's my Barry White? Ann And by the way I don't consider myself a mad old woman. I consider myself a MadWoman. Ann

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  2. I know who she was Tom. I may be grey but will not claim to be old quite yet. Mad maybe because I might have read some of her terrible work as a teen. Antiques are very interesting always. I am just now getting ready for four estate sales in the morning.

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  3. Not in the least interested in candlesticks no matter who they belonged to, nor am I interested in Barbara Cartlands c**p. Oh well...at least I'm still mad and Canadian.

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  4. I remember La Cartland very well. And like Boston Woman, I can clearly remember her photo on the back jacket of her books, carefully coiffed and a prodigious amount of makeup. She also used dots, eg ... a lot in her books ... I suppose it saved time and effort thinking up actual ... you know ... words.

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  5. Dear Tom

    I am a crazy farm lady from Illinois. After reading your hysterical diatribe about John getting all the comments I have added you to my list of people overseas to stalk. Lucky you

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  6. I met her once in Hyde Park. She was like a pink version of The Queen Mum; only frothier. She came complete with silly dogette and pink feather boa! Totally forgetable (apart from the above).

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  7. absolutely and utterly facinating

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  8. If you click on the pink word, Boston Lady, it should come up with a pretty comprehensive list of her books - I never reached the bottom of it. You'll get some more Barry White later - be patient, please.

    There is a great 'Little Britain' comedy sketch with the fat bald one playing Cartland, sitting on a sofa, eating chocolates and dictating a novel, which is sort of how you describe the use of dots, Judith...

    Should I be pleased or scared, Donna O'? Please send a photo so I can make my mind up and know who to look out for. Anyhow, I didn't think that they gave passports to crazy farm people from Illinois.

    When Charles and Diana where married, there was a great 'Private Eye' cover showing her peeping around the door of Westminster Abbey saying, "Cooee! It's me!"

    Are you fascinated on a medical level, or have I converted you to the joy of rusty candlesticks, John?

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  9. Would you have one of Margaret Thatcher's candlesticks to complete the set?

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  10. 300 years old you say, she must have been in her mid thirties when she bought it!

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  11. Thatcher came from a family of grocers, Mice, Cartland was a cousin to our dear Queenie - I'm sorry, I'm a snob like that, but I would have one from Hitler's family - it would be worth an effing fortune!

    Er... you may be right, Grouch.

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