Thursday, 17 May 2018

Fully-functioning disfunctionals


Rachel has just reminded me of a brilliant book by Sue Townsend called 'The Queen and I'. In it, a bloodless revolution headed by a Jeremy Corbyn-type figure gets the entire Royal Family sent to a small council house on an estate in the suburbs, where they subsist on benefits and the Queen goes shopping for food bargains in the local supermarket.

The Queen copes very well (as I am sure she would in real life), mixing with the neighbours and popping round to borrow cups of sugar, etc. but Prince Phillip falls into a deep depression and spends all day watching TV with the curtains drawn. Occasionally he can be heard shouting things like, "Bloody fuzzy-wuzzies!" at the screen, but that is about all.

When Charles and Diana had their fairy-tale wedding, the court's biggest fear was that Barbara Cartland would gate-crash Westminster Abbey. She was a close relative of both of them, so probably thought she had the right.  Harry and Megan's biggest fear is probably that her father will turn up after all. I can only imagine the off-the-scale levels of anxiety that the organisers must be experiencing right now.

I think that the Royal Family are worth every penny for the entertainment value alone.

24 comments:

  1. Ever since I declined my invitation, it seems to have become a trend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you didn't get as far as ordering a new suit.

      Delete
  2. A prize goes to the first to spot a member of Meghan's family at the wedding.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. None have been invited, but all the vaguely distant ones are in digs as close to Windsor as possible.

      Delete
  3. The Sue Townsend book was wickedly funny! The royals certainly add to the gaiety of the nation - in many ways.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am a genuine royalist, but I draw the line at camping out on the street 72 hours before the events.

      Delete
  4. I am always entertained by the royals. That book is priceless. Would make a good wedding present for them.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good idea. I am not sure if Megan would get it though.

      Delete
  5. And as somebody in Blogland this week remarked - when we look at some of the elected Heads of State around the World, I think we could do a lot worse than our Royal Family - and let's face it, they are trying their best to lighten up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would give them total power if I was... er... king.

      Delete
  6. They are OK .... far better than having a President and they bring a lot of money into the country ...... and they only cost each us £1 per year. ..... not too shabby ! XXXX

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would gladly pay £4 a year. The price of a pint, but much more satisfying.

      Delete
  7. And Saturday evening it will be over and life will go on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Everyone will be waiting for the baby. She had better be quick.

      Delete
    2. Such simple things life hearts these days. A new baby

      Delete
  8. Fully functioning disfunctionals at a function.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Her father doesn't seem to be a menace, but her kooky half-siblings and their hangers-on are proving to be.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wonder if he met the family before the proposal.

      Delete
  10. I believe A HUNDRED MILLION people will be watching the wedding. They must be doing something right!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will not be one of them. Constitutionally it isn't important enough. I might go to the reception though.

      Delete
  11. If you enjoyed " The Queen and I' you might like " The Uncommon Reader" by Alan Bennett.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do like Alan Bennet. I will look out for it.

      Delete
    2. I loved The Uncommon Reader. By the way,
      does one congratulate one's English friends on the occasion of this blessed event?

      Delete
    3. Maybe. Should we commiserate with our American friends for the loss of a much-loved TV star?

      Delete