Wednesday, 21 March 2018

Take a deep breath


They spent about three years staring at the Kohinoor Diamond before deciding the best way to split it with a hammer and chisel. Three years of preparation and one second of work? I don't think so.

I think it took three years for the diamond-cutter to pluck up the courage to do the job. I wonder how much he got paid for that one second?

In a very small way, some of my work involves almost as much time thinking (and worrying) about as it does to complete. You decide on what you think to be the best plan, then you carry it out, but I usually do not have the luxury of more than a few days to make a plan.

Although the monetary value of an item is always in the back of your mind - I regularly work on things which are worth more than I am likely to make for the rest of my life - it is, after all, only money.

I briefly consider the consequences of an accident which involves destroying an object which has been valued at six figures, then I ask myself what is the worst that could happen to me. The answer is always 'bankruptcy, followed by an enforced retirement in dire poverty'. I can cope with that.

The irony is that I am insured against maiming or killing someone in an accident at work for a maximum of £6,000,000.

This would be most acceptable to the families of all the people who regularly help me install items so heavy that they would most likely kill anyone they landed on, but it would be an insult to the clients and their family to have their lives held so cheap.

Next month I am being charged with repairing a classical figure which is threatening to break at the knees and come crashing down from a high alcove. I intend to use both belt and braces.


23 comments:

  1. I suppose that is the price you pay for working in stone rather than a job in cotton wool.

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    1. Recently I have been working with polystyrene - almost as forgiving as cotton wool.

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  2. As long as you don't do a "Del boy and Rodney"
    I'm sure for a man of your talents it will be a doodle. Good luck!

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    1. Doodles are what I usually make, but I am sure you meant doddle.

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  3. Your the man Tom, you have been at this game long enough. Glad I just work on plants.

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  4. Belt and braces for you or for the classical figure?
    Greetings Maria x

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  5. At the moment, I'm afraid I have a certain sympathy with the classical figure.
    Good luck with it all.

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    1. Are you referring to the Greek ones?

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  6. Get the boys to put some scaffolding up for you.

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    1. They do that all the time. I am not allowed to put it up myself. I am not even allowed to use a ladder.

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  7. Maria got it out first. You know the phrase, If only they could talk! This one is muttering "Belt and braces!" All will be well.

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    1. All has been to date. I am usually quite confident - I have to be.

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  8. What an interesting job. But I guess it’s not the lass in your pic. If so, you obviously thought too long.

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    1. No, this is a stock photo from Paris which fitted the image.

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  9. Your work amazes me Tom, at least what little I know about it. Artistic commitment does not wane with age does it? Stay safe.

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    1. I would like to show more pictures, but cannot. If you looked at my C.V. you would think I have done nothing for the last 25 years.

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  10. Proof if needed that overdoing it in Paris gets you legless, and you lose your balance.

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  11. I am sure in your day all the girls fell for you, not going to change now surely?

    LX

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  12. The Six Million Pound Man. I'd watch that show.

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