Thursday, 20 August 2015

Corbyn phenomena explained

Simple, no matter what party or political leaning you side with:

If you have money, you don't like Corbyn.

If you don't have money, you like what he has to say right now.

Are you going to argue with that? I am asking for a means-test if you do.

11 comments:

  1. I like him because he's got his knife out for BLAIR. I also like him because I can see PMQ's being a lot of fun. But then, I like him for the wrong reasons.

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    1. They seem like good enough reasons to me!

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  2. But those who love him please beware, his love is really only for the most leftie not the most needy.

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    1. Of course - there has to be a swing in the opposite direction from Blair's New Labour, otherwise there will be no (English) opposition worth the name.

      Do you think the righties in the Labour party (not even centre-ground) have done anything at all to help the needy in all the years they were in power? After Blair got into office, he had to fulfil all his promises to the least needy in society - I am thinking of supporters like Rupert Murdoch, to name but one) at the same time as completing the program of privatisation that Thatcher instigated.

      The current Labour party is even now rigging the voting system for whois going to be their new leader. Is that helping the needy? Is David Cameron helping the needy, or just looking after his party's donors?

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    2. I said it because all those who are saying "this is what this country needs, a retun to socialism" etc seem not to realise that we are all in this together and you don't just feed the poor and send all the others away, you have to feed everybody. I agree in part to what you are saying but the basics of economic theory are at least not totally ignored for the sake of political ideology.

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    3. 'One Nation Politics'; Labour tried to steal that idea from the Tories, but they were having none of it.

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    4. The thing is that even middle-class people are becoming poor now. Poverty is now related to where you are on the property market, and not how much food you have. If I had a mortgage, then I would be shitting myself about a rise in interest rates. I know it is a cliche, but the rift between rich and poor is growing ever wider, and I am not talking about children who cannot afford the latest play-station. All sorts of people use food-banks.

      Ideology is the only meaningful thing we have left in politics. Pragmatism shouldn't mean giving up aspirations.

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  3. I only ask one question - How do you see him coping in a world crisis?

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    1. I cannot imagine him doing any worse than the way previous world crisis have been coped with in the recent past. Their way of coping with them has produced the biggest threat to civilised humanity since Ghengis Khan.

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  4. I know the above statement in the main post is over-simplistic, but it is a good, general rule of thumb to gauge where Corbyn's support is coming from.

    The current 'Labour' party is in utter disarray right now, and is as about electable as a bunch of headless chickens. They are in fear of losing their cushy jobs, not in fear of the direction that the country as a whole is going. I only saw one or two episodes of 'In the Thick of It', but it just looked like a documentary to me, albeit a very funny one.

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