Thursday, 20 March 2014

Spring - time to throw away the oranges


The advantages of being too lazy to clear the gutters on your workshop. I've never seen a healthier dandelion.

Google tells me it's the first day of Spring and, for once, it feels like it.

Around both Spring and Autumn when the weather is in a transitional period, I often wake up and have to remind myself what time of year it is. Last week I spent the first two minutes of one day convinced that Christmas was just around the corner.

Every Christmas, I try to convince H.I. that nobody is going to eat any of the whole tray of mandarin oranges that she likes to buy just for the way they look and the fact that it has become a tradition, and every year - as predicted - nobody eats any of them.

Today, I finally got around to throwing the tray of mouldy fruit out with the rubbish.

20 comments:

  1. The Google animation for the first day of Spring this morning made me laugh ….. it doesn't take much !!
    Our Christmas throwaway fruit is a pineapple. I always buy one as, like H.I. it looks nice in the fruit bowl but, it never seems to get eaten….. probably because nobody can be bothered to cut it up and remove the spiky skin !
    At the moment I have two Scicilian lemons along with their leaves ….. I suspect that they might go the same way although, there's more that can be done with a lemon. XXXX

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    1. Ooooop's ….. Sicilian spelling mistake ! XXXX

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    2. The pineapple is an old centrepiece on 18th century tables as well. They couldn't afford to eat them.

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  2. Mandarins, Clementines, Oranges, and Lemons, don't last long in this house; I'll send you my address.

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    1. I'm surprised you haven't eaten the dogs.

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  3. In the kitchen slumbers a single bright orange with two green leaves - though 'organic' it keeps suspiciously long... We could invent a new spring ritual - analogue to 'Knut!' from Ikea after Christmas - instead of the trees we throw oranges out of the window at the first day of spring.

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    1. In Egypt, they throw bottles out of the window - very dangerous.

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  4. We have the same problem with oranges -- and this feeling of guilt whenever we see the fruit slowly withering away for weeks.

    BTW I've watched and thoroughly enjoyed The Canterbury Tale -- sounds like 'foo foo' to me -- and it looks like the little tyke doesn't talk and may have adlibbed something known only to him and maybe his Mum!

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  5. I read this out to the farmer at lunch time Tom - I do exactly the same - never mind eating the things, they look so Christmassy.

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    1. We also can never be bothered to stud them with cloves so they don't go rotten.

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  6. It's tempting to blame age for the Christmas confusion phenomena but I remember being exactly the same as a child.

    I used to have yellow sprouts in the bottom of the fridge but, since discovering a recipe involving sausage and fennel seeds too, by the insufferable Jamie Oliver, they . now get used up.

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    1. 'Bottom of Fridge' soup is not my speciality.

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  7. Too busy cooking last night's left-overs to replay to all tonight, but I will tomorrow.

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    1. Shoving anything from the fridge after the pub more like

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  8. Ahhh, those godforsaken trays of mandarin oranges! I thought that I am the only one who goes through this nonsense. I buy a tray with a mind filled with thoughts of healthy living and: "Oh look, you can get so much vitamin C! That will be soooo healthy!" Then I watch the mandarins like a science project. There will be a point in time when I know that nobody is going to eat them anymore, but I HAVE to hang on to them a little while longer before I throw them in the bin - vitamin C an' all.

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    1. I do the same with books. Just having them on the shelf makes me more knowledgable.

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  9. We had a box too. The mould was interesting as it grew on the underside of each orange where it touched its neighbour and was invisible and fooled you into thinking the oranges were fine until you touched them. All went in the bin.

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    1. So it's not just us then? I feel vindicated.

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