Thursday, 20 December 2012

A star is born


In a warm Jurassic sea, a tall plant with pentagonally-shaped stem finally gave up the ghost and collapsed on the bed of an ocean which no longer exists. Part of it landed on the shell of a marine bi-valve which had most probably given up the ghost a while before.

Very soon, silt washed over the shell and plant stem, covering it forever - or almost forever.

About 180,000,000 years later, H.I. and me were wandering around the cloisters of Lacock Abbey, where a lot of the sequences for the Harry Potter films were made, and we decided to go for lunch in a nearby pub. Sitting outside in the sunny garden my eyes ran over the gravel which was spread around the tables, and I noticed a small fossil shell lying amongst the rest of the stones, so I picked it up. When I turned it over, I found the star.

I love running my eyes over the ground, looking for tell-tale shapes and patterns - I have been doing it all my life - but this has to be one of the most unexpected and pleasing finds ever. You will always find fossil shells and sponges in dredged gravel, but the chances of finding something like this are extremely rare. I love running my eyes over the sky as well, looking at other stars.

I think I have already shown you this little fossil, but it's Christmas again, and it has been brought out with the rest of the decorations. I never get tired of it, anyway.


20 comments:

  1. I though it was a Waitrose luxury mince pie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You would, you fat, diabetic old cunt. Merry Christmas.

      Delete
  2. This is wonderful to look at. What are its dimensions; I can't tell from the picture if it's the size of my thumb nail or if it's a cobble stone. Either way, fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's the size of your little toe nail, and the star is about 5 mm across.

      Delete
  3. -my window sills are covered with stones,fossils,rocks and driftwood--each with a story--I enjoyed yours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The combing of beaches, and car parks...

      Delete
  4. Never mind Waitrose Cro, it looks like one of my mince pie efforts and probably just as hard!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love it! Similar to it's me, i have some stones and shells i've collected from beachcombing.

    What a fabulous find!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trawl through you undies after a swim - you will be amazed (as would I).

      Delete
  6. That is a beautiful thing Tom. I have a friend like you - I can walk along and find absolutely nothing, she will find no end of interesting things.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I think that little star is amazing - remember the picture the first time round. A story in itself of it's journey from the sea bed to the pub car park. Glad you found it and rescued it.

    ReplyDelete
  8. awww cute!
    very much like your christmas card which arrived today!
    any thanks old boy
    x

    ReplyDelete
  9. Replies
    1. Sticky 'R's? Too many M & Ms. Any thanks would have done.

      Delete
  10. I thought it was a dodgy fruit mince tart too. But please don't call me what you called cro or else I will cry. (it's funnier when others are insulted) X

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a bit of a spectator sport really. I didn't mean it, btw, but I'll do almost anything for a laugh!

      Delete