Monday, 21 May 2012

P.O.A.


Ok, here it is - the moment you have all been scratching your arses for - the finished pear-tree surround in place in the 17th century Dorset study.

Well, my bit's finished, but the builder has to build an entire new wall surrounding it, then plaster it flush to the face of my stonework, so it will appear as if built in.  That will also hide the oak beam you can see either side of the frieze, and the fixings above it.  He will lose about 4.5 inches of room in his study, but for what spiritual gain?  Man cannot live by bread alone.

It's funny, but it looks quite small now it is up, but the frieze alone weighs a quarter of a ton, and the rest of it weighs about half a ton.  It is six feet three and a half inches wide - a half an inch wider than I am tall.

I am not showing you this out of simple pride in my achievements, or because you have held my hand for a short while down the arduous path which lead to it's design and creation.  Oh no, there is more to it than that.

I am hoping that one or two of you people that call yourselves interior designers will persuade your 'clients' that they need a good piece of English stonework, made by someone with an art-school training and 40 years of experience.

You can find my email address somewhere on this site.

Well don't just sit their staring, make a few phone calls!  Now!

36 comments:

  1. In case you don't know... click on the photo to enlarge it.

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  2. Ring ring. Hello, Nigel, Mise here. I have first refusal for you on the next commission from a most remarkable stonemason I've come across in Bath. Art-school training, 40 years of experience, a brilliant raconteur. Superb work. Courier me over the advance cheque and he can start tomorrow. Don't miss this chance.

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    1. That's my girl. Let's talk about your percentage.

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    2. P.S. I don't call myself a 'stonemason' - they are tradesmen. I am called a 'sculptor' - we are professionals.

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  3. Oh, and another bit of information: Those funny things at the bottom of the jambs (legs) depict 16th century cooking-pots, like 'marmites', and traditionally represent hospitality to visitors and guests. You can't beat a generous fire.

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  4. It looks WONDERFUL Tom ..... you are pretty damn good at this sculpting lark. If I hear of anyone wanting a stone fireplace, it's your email address I shall be giving.I'm afraid that I'm not an interior designer so, don't hold your breath !
    Will you be able to take a photo when it's all finished ?

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    1. This is the first fireplace I have done for years - I'll make anything. Yes, I'll go back after the plaster-work is done. It's a 1.5 hour drive from here, but a nice drive for that. Thanks for your kind comments.

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  5. Magnificent! I might know some people who would be interested, but you are a little too long of a drive down the way from Pennsylvania.

    Great work, I am sure you will get some calls.

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    1. I have shipped tons of stone to the States - distance no object.

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  6. Beautiful work! Simple gorgeous.
    I don't think I could afford you. Or your work!
    Your Friend, m.

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    1. Once Fred has been anchored, then you will be able to afford me, Mark. I know it.

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  7. It's absolutely beautiful, Tom. I am hugely impressed.

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    1. Why thank you, Judith. I'll do anything except grave stones.

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  8. If I had a) a manor house and b) some money, you would definitely be hired! It looks stunning, and I really do hope that you get to take a picture when everything is completed. Unfortunately, I completely lack friends in high places.

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    1. You had better move back to the Fatherland then, Iris. There are still a few Bismarks knocking about.

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  9. o you do nhs reductions?
    I can afford around 30 quid
    what could you do?

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    1. I could grease the cat's arse for that.

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  10. Well Tom, I think it is stunning. Definitely a work or art. One cannot get a sense of the scale from the photo...I was surprised by the measurements. I shall notify all my filthy rich friends and clients of you talent.

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    1. Yes, I should have had someone standing next to it, Raz. Actually, that shows that the proportions are good for the room, which was always a fear.

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  11. Bloody marvellous. Ben Franklin would be proud of you! (don't say it)

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    1. Ben Franklin (our old head of the sculpture department, not the American President, btw) - he, like all but one other, knew absolutely nothing about stone.

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    2. That's what I meant. MY very first Sculpture tutor, Hilary Stratton, worked for Gill, and as you can imagine was a true craftsman. Pity Farnham didn't employ such men.

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    3. You can count the traditional sculptors who teach in British art schools on one hand, but only if you have had a nasty industrial accident.

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  12. Just utterly beautiful. If that were in my house I wouldn't be able to anything but gaze at it for hours at a time.

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    1. I think it is a fact that - during the making of it - I have stared at it for longer than anyone else will do for as long as it exists - about 5 hours a day for several months...

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  13. It's beautiful Tom...

    There is a major project (still in the planning stages) here in Niagara-on-the-lake. Have a look -
    http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2775086
    http://www.iment.com/maida/familytree/lansing/randwood.htm

    I'll keep my ear to the ground when the call for tenders goes out if you are interested.

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  14. Replies
    1. Beautiful Sarah (stay out of this, John, you bitter old animal-hoarder. You made your bed, now lie in it... X!).

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  15. You have a wonderful talent sir, that piece is stunningly beautiful. I expect you were relived that it stayed in one piece?

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    1. You speak the truth, Sir Toffee Apple. A breakage would have meant either my death, or the death of the person what broke it.

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