Tuesday, 6 March 2012

Fact or fiction

I thought it was about time I did a candlestick post. I know most of you are suffering as a result of my secrecy, so here is an old favourite, sitting next to my latest acquisition.

Both are shouting, "I am 16th century!", but one actually is and the other is about 400 years later.

One I paid a lot of money for, and the other I paid peanuts. Both will - in the long term - give me a good return on my investment, but more importantly, I love having them around.

Right now it is easy to tell which is which, but - with a little clever effort - I could fake up the 19th century one so that only a real expert could tell the difference, but I am NOT going to do this.

I watched a 16th century copy sell for £400 the other night, even though the seller actually said she believed it to be a fake or copy. If it had been the real thing, then it would have fetched £3000 no problem. So it makes me wonder how many people were prepared to gamble that she had got it wrong in the description - I am sure it was only worth about £100.

Worth a gamble? I think I might have put about £500 on it if I had been feeling a little richer, so I guess the answer is deemed to be 'yes'.

I gambled on the real one in the photo, and I think that paid off - or is yet to pay off.

Like I say, I like having them around anyway, and the 19th century copy would be useful as a film prop.

Thinking of making an Elizabethan movie?

18 comments:

  1. a movie with candlesticks in it?
    oh be still my beating heart!

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    1. I could give you a little help with the appreciation side of things, Johno - I think - judging from your last post - you may need it.

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    2. That's what I'm known and loved for!

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  2. I really like both of them. If I had to choose which one was the older of the two, Tom, I think I'd go for the one on the left hand side. I like that one best. The pair of 17th century candlesticks I fell in love with a few months ago - I watched them go on eBay - you did alright there.

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    1. Yes, quite right, Moll. Which pair did you see go on eBay? I haven't bought a pair for quite a while, though I did sell a couple to an Australian recently. I'm intrigued as to how you know how well I have done!

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    2. I think they were yours http://tomstephenson.blogspot.com/2011/09/for-john.html - the picture looked similar

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    3. I think I made a loss on those - what makes you think I 'did alright' on them?

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    4. I'm really sad now, you didn't do as alright as you wanted to - I have no conception of money, I just like things or I don't and I really liked those. 'Did alright' withdrawn then

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    5. Don't get involved, Moll - it's only money.

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  3. now if mr clooney was holding one of your candlesticks I could forgive the boredom of the post

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    1. And what would you like Mr Clooney to be doing with it in his hand?

      Period props are big business, as you probably know. Some films are great, and others are bloody irritating if you are looking at details.

      Some companies buy and keep all props (Harry Potter has about 30 container-loads), others buy and return at a loss, and others simply rent. Some actually have things made for them, because - for instance - it would cost about £20,000 to have a table laid out in 18th century glass, but only about £2000 to have it made in Czech, or wherever. Glass is delicate stuff.

      Did you like 'The Madness of King George'? Did you notice the props?

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  4. Copies are OK, as long as they demand a copy price. I have a pair of brass sticks similar to the one on the right. I think mine are Victorian copies of older ones.

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    1. As I have got older, I can tolerate pastiche more and more. I think my fantasy world has expanded back to childhood size. For instance, since they have made light bulbs which flicker like real flames, I regret not having a front porch to keep a couple in old lamps at night. Maybe it's J.K. Rowling's fault.

      As a 'collector' though, it has to be the real thing.

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  5. I prefer the one on the left Tom but had persuaded myself that the right hand one was probably the older. Have just read Milly above and see that I preferred the old one. These things are so difficult. Don't think i could bear to part with either.

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    1. I'd part with both for the right price, Weaver (about twenty times more for the one on the left, as the right).

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