Thursday, 17 February 2011

The brook

Remember that little brook that runs past the back of my workshop, that has been watering fields, humans and animals for thousands of years? Well I took a little walk up to the top with a camera today, and here's the unedited results. The stone structure with a cistern is a Victorian control-system for the lake. The piles of stone seen in the edge of the fields are parts of old Roman villas which have been ploughed-out by farmers. The many Scot's Pines that are around are a signal of how ancient this place is - they are self-seeding. The brook breaks ground from the fields at the top (but starts a lot further up - about 3 miles away - who knows?), then when it gets to my workshop, goes underground again, beneath the old Coaching Road to London from Bath, then joins the 'Bybrook', which is packed full of fat, brown trout. The dog's name is Dolores.


video

17 comments:

  1. Well Tom I picked the perfect time to finally visit your blog. Of course I love Dolores as she is in "our" black&white theme at our house. However, your footage of the brook and surrounding area is beautiful and relaxing. Interesting to read your text as well and understand more of what we see in the video. Ann

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  2. Yes, I thought you might like Dolly, Ann!

    John - shall I whisper in your ear?

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  3. Lovely and peaceful-I`d never get any work done with all that right on my door step- enjoyed the bird song too. Trust John...tut !

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  4. I hardly get any work done anyway, Janet. I thought the sound of all that running water would make John prick up his ears.

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  5. thomas, I am 48....... any tap running and I m off to the lav!

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  6. I'm 59 and I go every morning at 6 a.m., as regular as clockwork - about 2 minutes before I wake up.

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  7. And I thought I was the only one! 52 for me! Ann

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  8. I've just had to take the dog out.... and he's only 8 weeks.

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  9. The kid in me wants to don boots and go and build a dam. (I was up at 2.00 a.m. and I'm only .. no, not telling!)

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  10. What a cheerful tour this was. Love the birds singing in the background and the sound of the creek is almost hypnotising! Miss Dolly looks shy in this video! It's almost time for me to head to bed...1245am here now. G'nite!

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  11. After years of wondering why people refer to 'babbling' brooks, I sat down next to one and went into a sort of trance. You can actually hear voices after a while, but you cannot tell what they are saying - a bit like madness.

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  12. thank you so much for this....I sat through the whole thing twice. The sound of the water reminds me of the culverts in spring when I was a kid on the farm. What beautiful country side! Loved Dolores as well....spell her name with an e and she's my namesake.

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  13. Very atmospheric that brook Tom. Love Dolores although it is a bit of a mouthful to call when you want her to come to you. I used to have a cat which we called Coco - and calling her last thing at night was always a bit embarrassing. As to my age - it is far to old to be revealed in cyberland.

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  14. Thank You Delores.

    I had a friend who had a dog called 'Copper' which hated uniforms. One day, the door-bell rang and there was a policeman standing there, so the dog attacked him as they shouted, "COPPER! COPPER!".

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  15. I loved Dolly's shy Princess Diana downwards look. "Brook" is a very British word, isn't it ... over here we have creeks. Babbling creek doesn't sound the same.

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